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 Chassis/compression and why

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MP



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PostSubject: Chassis/compression and why   Chassis/compression and why Icon_minitimeFri Nov 29, 2019 6:25 pm

Hi Michael

I have a question for Michael. What is the reason why the chassis causes compression?

Thank you

Best Regards
Mats
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PostSubject: Re: Chassis/compression and why   Chassis/compression and why Icon_minitimeFri Nov 29, 2019 8:03 pm

Hi Mats

"I have a question for Michael. What is the reason why the chassis causes compression?"

The easy answer is because the audio signal passes through mechanical conduits and all energy conduits host the electromagnetic field and interact with the other forces. In physics the 4 forces are called the 4 fundamental interactions.

•Gravitational force
•Electromagnetic force
•The strong nuclear force
•The Weak Nuclear force

Chassis/compression and why Four-Fundamental-Forces

These are called the four fundamental forces of nature, and they govern everything that happens in the universe.

Gravity

Gravity is the attraction between two objects that have mass or energy, whether this is seen in dropping a rock from a bridge, a planet orbiting a star or the moon causing ocean tides. Gravity is probably the most intuitive and familiar of the fundamental forces, but it's also been one of the most challenging to explain.

Isaac Newton was the first to propose the idea of gravity, supposedly inspired by an apple falling from a tree. He described gravity as a literal attraction between two objects. Centuries later, Albert Einstein suggested, through his theory of general relativity, that gravity is not an attraction or a force. Instead, it's a consequence of objects bending space-time. A large object works on space-time a bit like how a large ball placed in the middle of a sheet affects that material, deforming it and causing other, smaller objects on the sheet to fall toward the middle.

Though gravity holds planets, stars, solar systems and even galaxies together, it turns out to be the weakest of the fundamental forces, especially at the molecular and atomic scales. Think of it this way: How hard is it to lift a ball off the ground? Or to lift your foot? Or to jump? All of those actions are counteracting the gravity of the entire Earth.

The weak force

The weak force, also called the weak nuclear interaction, is responsible for particle decay. This is the literal change of one type of subatomic particle into another. So, for example, a neutrino that strays close to a neutron can turn the neutron into a proton while the neutrino becomes an electron.

Physicists describe this interaction through the exchange of force-carrying particles called bosons. Specific kinds of bosons are responsible for the weak force, electromagnetic force and strong force. In the weak force, the bosons are charged particles called W and Z bosons. When subatomic particles such as protons, neutrons and electrons come within 10^-18 meters, or 0.1% of the diameter of a proton, of one another, they can exchange these bosons. As a result, the subatomic particles decay into new particles.

The weak force is critical for the nuclear fusion reactions that power the sun and produce the energy needed for most life forms here on Earth. It's also why archaeologists can use carbon-14 to date ancient bone, wood and other formerly living artifacts. Carbon-14 has six protons and eight neutrons; one of those neutrons decays into a proton to make nitrogen-14, which has seven protons and seven neutrons. This decay happens at a predictable rate. The weak force is critical for the nuclear fusion reactions that power the sun and produce the energy needed for most life forms here on Earth.

Electromagnetic force

The electromagnetic force, also called the Lorentz force, acts between charged particles, like negatively charged electrons and positively charged protons. Opposite charges attract one another, while like charges repel. The greater the charge, the greater the force. And much like gravity, this force can be felt from an infinite distance (albeit the force would be very, very small at that distance).

As its name indicates, the electromagnetic force consists of two parts: the electric force and the magnetic force. At first, physicists described these forces as separate from one another, but researchers later realized that the two are components of the same force.

The electric component acts between charged particles whether they're moving or stationary, creating a field by which the charges can influence each other. But once set into motion, those charged particles begin to display the second component, the magnetic force. The particles create a magnetic field around them as they move. So when electrons zoom through a wire to charge your stereo, the wire becomes magnetic.

The electromagnetic force is responsible for some of the most commonly experienced phenomena: friction, elasticity, the normal force and the force holding solids together in a given shape. These actions can occur because of charged (or neutralized) particles interacting with one another. The normal force that keeps a book on top of a table (instead of gravity pulling the book through to the ground), for example, is a consequence of electrons in the table's atoms repelling electrons in the book's atoms.

The strong nuclear force

The strong nuclear force, also called the strong nuclear interaction, is the strongest of the four fundamental forces of nature. It's 6 thousand trillion trillion trillion (that’s 39 zeroes after 6!) times stronger than the force of gravity, according to the HyperPhysics website. And that's because it binds the fundamental particles of matter together to form larger particles. It holds together the quarks that make up protons and neutrons, and part of the strong force also keeps the protons and neutrons of an atom's nucleus together.

Much like the weak force, the strong force operates only when subatomic particles are extremely close to one another. They have to be somewhere within 10-15 meters from each other, or roughly within the diameter of a proton.

The strong force is odd, though, because unlike any of the other fundamental forces, it gets weaker as subatomic particles move closer together. It actually reaches maximum strength when the particles are farthest away from each other. Once within range, massless charged bosons called gluons transmit the strong force between quarks and keep them "glued" together. A tiny fraction of the strong force called the residual strong force acts between protons and neutrons. Protons in the nucleus repel one another because of their similar charge, but the residual strong force can overcome this repulsion, so the particles stay bound in an atom's nucleus.

Unifying nature

The outstanding question of the four fundamental forces is whether they're actually manifestations of just a single great force of the universe. If so, each of them should be able to merge with the others, and there's already evidence that they can.

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PostSubject: Re: Chassis/compression and why   Chassis/compression and why Icon_minitimeFri Nov 29, 2019 8:46 pm

The Audio Component Chassis

Audio component designers have never been up on the fundamental interactions of physics. If they would have the "audio component" never would have been invented, or we would have advanced beyond the chassis technology by now. Audio chassis are nothing more than electronic parts architecture. Take an audio circuit board outside of it's chassis and you will hear the soundstage open up. Same holds true for removing any material or moving the material into different physical arrangements.

Audio component materials have to play by the same rules as the rest of the universe. "fair exchange" is a term I used back in my early days of designing which basically means "let the energy tune". If you look at the universe you will see that matter responds naturally seeking to be in-tune with itself through a balance of mass and a shape as particles collect and interact. The spherical shape is a perfect example of physics in action.

Chassis/compression and why M2091
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Chassis/compression and why M2092

When we introduce a chassis into the mix we are cutting into the audio signal's fundamental space of interaction. The result is a change of the audio signal performance.

Chassis/compression and why M2093

Chassis are usually signal distorting boxes according to what we have found. In some cases there are plastics and other materials, such as certain types of woods, that interact positively with the signal when traveling through the chain. The type, size and shape of interacting materials as well as the environment conditions literally shape the performance of any recording.

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PostSubject: Re: Chassis/compression and why   Chassis/compression and why Icon_minitimeSun Dec 01, 2019 7:15 am

Thank you very much for the answer Michael ! I think they will get a little chin drop when they read it Very Happy
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PostSubject: Re: Chassis/compression and why   Chassis/compression and why Icon_minitimeSun Dec 01, 2019 9:14 am


Hi Michael and Mats

Nice to see interactions going on again on this site.

While Michael gives a well-reasoned reply (as he usually does), my question is in response to his comment "Audio component designers have never been up on the fundamental interactions of physics. If they would have the "audio component" never would have been invented, or we would have advanced beyond the chassis technology by now."

Michael, if we were to take your thinking forward and we accepted everything you just said about what is wrong/limiting about chassis, what will CD players, DACs, amps etc in your world look like? Let us be "real-world" practical -- audio equipment are things that have a. potentially lethal voltages b. the risk of careless contact causing total equipment failure c. safety regulations that have to complied with. How will you deal with these constraints?

If you and fellow-tunees are wondering why in my later system pix, I went back to casings and covers (although your advice of cracking screws and no cable ties etc are observed) it is because I got a couple of nasty shocks from exposed mains and once I burned up an i/c chip by accidentally shorting it to ground -- and of all the things in that CD player that i/c was the one piece of replacement that could not be bought from the Mousers/element14. It had to be ordered from the manufacturer and it put that player out of action for months.

So to Sonic the issues in my questions are real and I have experienced the downsides of open board PCBs and equipment.

Sonic



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PostSubject: Re: Chassis/compression and why   Chassis/compression and why Icon_minitimeSun Dec 01, 2019 3:42 pm

Mats said

"Thank you very much for the answer Michael ! I think they will get a little chin drop when they read it."

mg

It's pretty amazing when you think about how long this hobby has been around and the lack of understanding there is about the audio signal.

Sonic said

"Michael, if we were to take your thinking forward and we accepted everything you just said about what is wrong/limiting about chassis, what will CD players, DACs, amps etc in your world look like? Let us be "real-world" practical -- audio equipment are things that have a. potentially lethal voltages b. the risk of careless contact causing total equipment failure c. safety regulations that have to complied with. How will you deal with these constraints?

mg

My real world is "I've never been shocked by a stereo component". That's why there are on/off switches, plugs on the walls and circuit breakers in our circuit boxes. If one wants to go further rubber gloves. So my first question back is why are you shocking yourself? If you're prone to be careless have a professional help you.

Chassis/compression and why M2094

As far as the look, one has to ask themselves why did audio go from wood chassis to metal (the worst sounding chassis material)?

my present amplifier, 3"x5"
Chassis/compression and why M2095a

HEA is and has been for a long time "overbuilt". There have been products that came out that were far more practical but never got the attention they should have. One example was Stan Warren's CD Max. Another are the Magnavox players. Both of these are far more "real world" than high end audio components. For the past 15 or so years products have been and are being produced that by a large margin outperform the very huge and unpractical components.

Sonic

"So to Sonic the issues in my questions are real and I have experienced the downsides of open board PCBs and equipment."

mg

Sonic your downside has nothing to do with sound but more you not using safety first when doing your experiments.

Sonic

"if we were to take your thinking forward and we accepted everything you just said"

mg

Who's we? study I ask you this not to be antagonizing but more accurate. I don't see listeners running out to buy HEA and at the same time see many going low mass and simple getting much better sound. We are showing these systems in real time.

Chassis/compression and why M2096
mass interference vs mass interacting

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